Celebrate Those Who Make the World More Accessible

James T. Neubacher portrait on a blue field

Ensuring access to healthcare for Deaf patients through the medical interpreters program. Designing architectural solutions to improve building access. Creating a youth summer camp where medical care and accessibility are built in.

These are a few examples of the work celebrated by the James T. Neubacher Award. Established by the university's Council for Disability Concerns in October 1990, the award is a memorial to James T. Neubacher, a university alumnus, and columnist for the Detroit Free Press who advocated for equal rights and opportunities for people with disabilities.

"This award honors the work started by disability advocates of the past that paved a path to the beginnings of accessibility and inclusion, which drives the initiatives that many are undertaking today," states Pam McGuinty, Co-chair, Council for Disability Concerns.  "We look forward to acknowledging the impactful work that many within the University of Michigan and surrounding areas have accomplished to move the needle towards a more welcoming culture for faculty, staff, and students at the university."

The James T. Neubacher Award

The award is presented to a faculty or staff member, student, or alum of the University of Michigan for significant achievements in: 

  • Empowering people with disabilities
  • Advocating for or advancing disability rights or disability justice
  • Increasing the accessibility of programs and services to promote disability inclusion 

Make a nomination by August 15, 2022

Celebrate passionate advocates for disability inclusion with a nomination for the 33rd annual James T. Neubacher Award.

The award is supported by the Office of the President, the U-M Council for Disability Concerns, University Human Resources, and Michigan Medicine.

 

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