U-M Career Services for Staff

FAQs

    I'm not happy with my job. What should I do?

    What resources can help me find another job immediately?  

    I've been in the same job for ten years and... Any advice?

    I've applied for 30 U-M jobs in the last five months without much success...

    I feel I can handle more responsibilities. What should I do?  

    How can I increase my chances of being considered for a promotion without necessarily going back to school?

    Where can I get an idea of the salary range for a U-M posting?

    I want a better picture of my " market value." Where can I find salary information for positions like mine at other universities, as well as in other industries?

    Are there U-M employees I can talk to about how they manage their careers?

    When I apply for an internal job posting, should I send a copy to the hiring department?

    How do I approach my supervisor regarding a more flexible work schedule or job sharing?

     


    I'm not happy with my job. What should I do?

    First, find out why. Perhaps there is an easy solution, such as a simple discussion with your supervisor. Or maybe it's time to explore other careers. Career development is no small task. In fact, it's a process that can involve months of soul searching, researching and networking. This Web site provides you with the structure to start. Begin with self-assessment to help you define a new career goal. Then, use the information in the other sections to help reach your goal. 

    What resources can help me find another job immediately?

    Unfortunately, there is no "quick fix" when it comes to career development. However, if you are currently applying for jobs, the Job Search Preparation section may be most helpful. If you are just beginning to consider a job change, the assessment section is the best place to start.

    I've been in the same job for ten years and... Any advice?

    Your supervisor should be your first source of information as he/she is probably familiar with campus resources and opportunities. You may also contact the Alumni Association or The Career Center for assessment of your interests, skills and abilities. For a small fee, these offices offer individual assessment, including interpretation of various assessment tests. 

    I've applied for 30 U-M jobs in the last five months without much success...

    It may be time to look at one of the career development options available at the University of Michigan. They can help to critique (and perhaps find ways to improve) your resume, cover letter, and interviewing skills.

     

    I feel I can handle more responsibilities. What should I do?

    Enrich your current job! Ask your supervisor for special projects and additional responsibilities. Make suggestions for improvement. Discuss ways in which your special skills can be better used. And volunteer to serve on unit- or university-wide committees. Take advantage of training through HRD. Learning new skills can really add value to your department.

    How can I increase my chances of being considered for a promotion without necessarily going back to school?

    A job can have different levels based on responsibility and depth of expertise. For example, a job may exist at the associate, intermediate, senior or lead level. All of the levels are shown in the Career Path Navigator. Up to 70% of jobs at U-M have levels.  That means you can view the descriptions on the Career Path Navigator and see the key differences in duties and responsibilities for a job at each level as a tool for identifying advancement opportunities and/or career planning.

    Where can I get an idea of the salary range for a U-M posting?

    Salary ranges are determined by individual units and they are encouraged to include the range for the position in the job postings.

    I want a better picture of my "market value." Where can I find salary information for positions like mine at other universities, as well as in other industries?

    The best place to start is with your supervisor and/or your Human Resources representative. They should be able to provide you with information on how the University evaluates the market value for your specific job. You may be tempted to search salary sites on the internet, but without the proper contexting, the information you find there may be more confusing than helpful.

    Are there U-M employees I can talk to about how they manage their careers?

    Unfortunately, there is no system in place. However, various groups regularly sponsor presentations where staff members share their career histories. Check the Record for announcements. Some staff members will respond to a request for an informational interview. Take the initiative, ask them to lunch and let them know you are interested in how they've arrived at their position.

    When I apply for an internal job posting, should I send a copy to the hiring department?

    You should not have to send a copy to the hiring department. There is no general rule about calling the department. It may be perceived as pushy or, alternatively, as being confident and assertive. One thing is certain, don't call repeatedly.

    How do I approach my supervisor regarding a more flexible work schedule or job sharing?

    Don't just ask, give answers. Present one or more possible plans illustrating the type of schedule you are interested in and how it will work for everyone. Keep in mind that your unit must continue to perform its functions, so be ready to explain how a change in schedule would facilitate or maintain your unit's performance.

    You can also visit the Work-Life Resource Center for information on flexible work arrangements.